December: Pralines

“There’s no other treat that’s more Southern, definitely none that’s more New Orleans than pralines.”

At this very moment, I am sitting on a plane heading New Orleans, getting ready to eat all the flavors that the city can offer. Pecans are native to the Southern United States, and New Orleans is the city where the American recipe for pralines originated. So what better was to celebrate my time in the Big Easy than with Louisiana’s favorite candy?

IMAG4915

Pralines probably originated in France around 1600, although at the time they were made with hazelnuts or almonds, and used caramelized sugar instead of nougat. French settlers brought the recipe for pralines to Louisiana, and the abundance of pecan trees made a perfect match for these creamy candies. Today, the word pralinĂ© is used in France and Switzerland to describe various centers coated in chocolate, although chocolate isn’t used in the American version.

Get the recipe here!

IMAG4920

You might remember earlier this year when I tried to make caramel from scratch, but I didn’t cook it long enough so it didn’t solidify properly. A rational person would recognize their mistake and invest in a candy thermometer before attempting to make another confection. But instead I tried the less-precise “cold water test,” and because I wasn’t exactly sure what to look for, I missed the mark slightly. This recipe doesn’t mention anything about cooling the pralines in the fridge, and other recipes that I referenced only say to let them stand until completely cool. Unfortunately for me, “completely cool” was still not solid and impossible to pick up with your hands, but it might work drizzled over ice cream.

How interesting that with my final post of 2018, I have become the very thing that bothers me the most about food blogs: the person who says, “I didn’t follow the recipe and it turned out terrible!” In the future, I will avoid making desserts with caramel-like consistencies unless I have the proper equipment. This was truly the only recipe that I couldn’t salvage in some way, but 1 recipe out of 24 that I tried this year isn’t bad at all!

Cheers to all the delicious food from this year, and stay tuned for more (mostly) vegetarian recipes coming in 2019!

IMAG4928

Advertisements

About lgaylord

Louisa believes in expanding horizons and learning - anything that broadens our minds beyond the here and now, allowing us to learn from the past and innovate for the future. She is particularly interested new and inventive methods of sustainability: city planning and green buildings, creating new objects from old trash, and ways that nature can provide examples for new materials and construction. She is also curious about new scientific breakthroughs, technology and discoveries, and how they will shape the future of consumerism and marketing. While science is important to advancing society, Louisa believes that music, education, art and culture are equally necessary, especially on a local community level.
This entry was posted in Books and Literature, Exploring our World, Flavors and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s